Roberts Pizza and Dough Company to re-open May 10

May 1, 2019

By Jesse Wright, Staff Write

After a year of searching for the perfect new home, husband and wife team Robert and Dana Garvey are reopening Robert’s Pizza and Dough Company in Streeterville. Located at 465 N. McClurg Ct off the Riverwalk, Robert’s Pizza will continue the pair’s commitment to contribute to the pizza landscape of Chicago and showcase their signature ‘Za Dough’– a 20-year-in-the-making, family dough recipe perfected by Garvey himself. To celebrate its highly-anticipated return, Robert’s Pizza will be giving away one free slice of pizza per guest from the to-go counter between 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. on May 10.

“The Streeterville neighborhood is our home and where we launched our pizza journey,” says Garvey. “It was important for us to find a location that would allow us to grow operationally, while still serving our community. We’re thrilled to be bringing back our pizza and can’t wait for Chicago to try our new menu items and experience our new, expanded location.”

Robert’s Pizza will continue to offer its classic rotating lineup of up to 15 gourmet brick-oven pizzas, “create-your-own” pizzas with toppings from select premium ingredients and the signature Robert’s Pizza Flight. Local favorites returning to the menu will include The Lia, Peking Duck, Huevos Rancheros, Prosciutto and Arugula and the nightly special Seafood pizza.

The warm and intimate environment seats 142 and includes banquette seating, an 18-seat bar, a private dining room for up to 12, and outdoor and dock-side seating for 70 during patio season.

Robert’s Pizza will be open for dinner Sunday – Thursday from 4 p.m. – 10 p.m. and until 11 p.m. for Friday and Saturday dinner service. Delivery will be available via Chow Now, Caviar and the restaurant’s direct website. For more information on Robert’s Pizza, please visit www.robertspizzacompany.com or call (312) 265-1328. Robert’s Pizza is also available for special events.

Peregrine falcons find a home in Chicago

(Published April 29, 2019)

Abhinanda Datta, Staff Writer

If you spot a mid-sized raptor swoop in at incredible speed and catch another bird in flight, don’t be surprised—it is just a peregrine falcon.

Found throughout the world, these birds have found a home in the Midwest, with more than 20 American peregrine falcons in the Chicagoland area.

With a body length of 15 – 20 inches, the peregrines can attain a speed of 200 mph when diving on their prey.

According to Mary Hennen, collections assistant in the Bird Division at the Field Museum, an estimated 400-500 pairs of Peregrines once nested in the Midwest and eastern United States. But by the 1960s, the species had been wiped out regionally.

“The primary cause was the buildup of DDT and its byproducts in the birds,” she said. “These accumulated chemicals caused abnormal reproductive behavior in adults and thinning of shells, which led to egg breakage.”

The Chicago Peregrine Program began in 1985 as a cooperative effort between the Chicago Academy of Sciences, Lincoln Park Zoo, Illinois Department of Conservation and the Illinois Audubon Society, with the aim of restoring the population.

From a single breeding pair at a Chicago-Wacker site in 1988, Illinois had 12 breeding pairs in over 23 different territories by 2011.

“Although Peregrines still remain endangered in some states, in Illinois, the population has rebounded. In fact, our Peregrine status has been upgraded from endangered to threatened,” Hennen said.

In May, eggs that were laid during March-April, are incubated for about 30-32 days. The male and the female take turns looking after the eggs. Hatching begins in mid-May or around Mother’s Day.

“This is also the time period where the adults are most defensive of the nest site. Males will spend most of their time hunting in order to feed the female and chicks,” Hennen said.

In the coming months, especially around mid-June to July, people can see the peregrine fledglings’ first flight as they glide down from the nest site. People can also observe the birds through the Illinois Peregrine Webcams found on the Field Museum website. For more information, visit fieldmuseum.com.

A peregrine falcon from a 2018 webcam in Rockford. Photo courtesy the Field Museum

Not Your Average Mother’s Day

(Published April 29, 2019

By Stephanie Racine, Staff Writer

Treat mom to a unique Mother’s Day experience that goes beyond brunch.

Family Game Night Out

Does mom love family game night, but is often stressed playing host? Try Family Game Night Out in Lakeview, which takes the pressure off mom. Invite the whole family, from 6-24 guests, to play familiar party games in a private room that includes a host. Family Game Night Out is BYOB and welcomes guests to bring snacks. $45 per person for a 2-3 hour experience, depending on the number of guests. Make reservations in advance. Recommended for game players 18 and up.

gamenightout.com

2828 N Clark St., Chicago

312-448-724

Donut Tour

If mom is a pastry fan, then the Chicago Donut tour will be a treat. The Underground Donut Tour has two Chicago-based tours, one of which covers downtown, the other covers Wicker Park. The downtown tour encompasses two miles and each donut shop stop includes samples. Tours run Thursday to Sunday and begin at 9 a.m. The downtown tour is $35 for adults and $15 for children.

undergrounddonuttour.com

Freeze and Float

For a relaxing Mother’s Day, take mom to River North’s Freeze and Float, a recently opened spa specializing in cryotherapy treatments, infrared saunas and flotation therapy. Cryotherapy hyper-cools the body for three minutes, with temperatures in the chambers reaching -184F. According to the Freeze and Float website, Cryotherapy has rejuvenating effects, similar to the benefits of icing inflamed muscles. Infrared saunas improve circulation and help with injury recovery. Floatation therapy in Epsom-salt filled water is a meditative experience. They also offer classic massages, facials, and beauty treatments. For pricing and more information, visit Freeze and Float’s website, or call them.

freezefloatspa.com

371 W Ontario St.

312 809-7008

Windy Kitty

For the cat-lover mom, Windy Kitty is the place to go. Windy Kitty is a cat cafe in Wicker Park, where mom can hang out with some rescue cats, while having a snack or coffee. Cats at the cafe are available for adoption, but enjoy being visited too. Windy Kitty also features a kitten nursery, available to visit for those over 10. Windy Kitty strongly suggests reservations. Admission is $14 per person per hour. For parties of five people or more, Windy Kitty recommends a private party reservation. They often have fun events, such as Yoga with Cats or Painting with Cats. For more information, visit their website, or email them.

windykittychicago.com

meow@windykittychicago.com

1746 W North Ave

Let it Out

Moms often are subject to a lot of stress. To give mom a way to let go of that stress, take her to The Rage Room, in River North’s Escapades Escape Room. For those over 18, the Rage Room allows visitors to break as many items, such as televisions, crockery, and computer equipment, as they desire. The Rage Room provides safety wear to go along with a baseball bat, crowbar or golf club. The room can be shared with up to 15 people in a party, but only one person goes in at a time. Experiences can last up to 2 hours, or can be as little as 15 minutes. Prices vary. Online reservations required. Visit their website for more information.

www.escapadesescapegames.com

153 W. Ohio

312-526-3072

Learn Something New

For the jack-of-all-trades mom, check out Dabble, which has classes available in a variety of subjects. Pasta making, archery, glassblowing and soap making are just a few available on Dabble in the upcoming weeks. They also have food tours, architecture tours and drinking tours. Prices, locations, and times vary. Dabble’s website has a list of classes and is constantly updating new times, dates, and experiences.

dabble.co/chicago/

Streeterville man’s new book tells history through the cemetery

(Published April 29, 2019)

By Jesse Wright, staff writer

Streeterville photographer and author Larry Broutman knows a thing or two about cemeteries.

His newest book about the city’s cemeteries, “Chicago Eternal,” in April was awarded a silver award in the regional book category by the Independent Book Publisher’s Association. .

For Broutman, cemeteries aren’t maudlin but rather they are instructive.

“The history of Chicago can be quite well told by walking through the cemeteries and looking at Chicagoans who have passed away,” he said.

His previous book, “Chicago Monumental,” focuses on the city’s monuments. After that book was published, Broutman said he began thinking that many monuments are in cemeteries. So, he went searching.  

“Some of the monuments were done by world famous sculptors,” he said. “I had been in a couple of cemeteries when I realized, ‘Wow there are some pretty incredible stories there.’”

So, he began to tell those stories.

His research took him to over 30 cemeteries across Cook County and when he wrapped up, he had 300 stories.

“It’s a hefty book and a time consuming one, but I am retired,” he said.

Before going into a cemetery, Broutman explained he talked with the keeper first.

“I always was careful about the respectful aspect of it and first I consulted the cemetery staff and told them what I was doing, and I asked them if photography was OK,” he said.

Broutman said almost every cemetery was fine with the project as he set about taking photos of grave markers, monuments, tombs and war memorials.

Streeterville residents might already be familiar with Broutman’s work as it adorns some of the walls of the Lurie Children’s Hospital. Broutman said he’s been an avid photographer for years, and he has travelled through Africa taking nature photos.

Several years ago, the Lurie Hospital asked him to take photos of Chicago scenes, so he mixed them together with his African photos. The result included  a tiger lying in the flowers along Michigan Avenue and he replaced the horses on a horse drawn carriage with zebras. Now these photos decorate the Lurie’s walls.

The project also sparked another interest, photographing the city.

“Once I did that I couldn’t stop,” he said. “I spent another year taking Chicago scenes all over the city.”

Then, of course, he moved on to the grave yard.

“Chicago Eternal” is available at Amazon.com for $43.25.

Summer fun for all: Parents have plenty to choose from in local summer camps

(Published April 29, 2019)

By Jesse Wright, Staff Writer

With summer around the corner, schools, museums and even watersport companies are offering summer camps for kids.

At Camp GEMS, kids can explore the city through a six-week program that mimics the school’s curriculum, although the program is open to all kids, even non-students. Through the camp, kids explore the whole city and the build and design the city features. Each week is $475 or $2,700 for six weeks. Camp Gems is open to kids 3-12.

Taneal Sanders, a GEMS teacher, said Camp GEMS aims to benefit the entire student.

“We focus on keeping the kids’ minds and bodies active,” she said.

Each week has a different theme, and students learn lessons based on each theme. The first week is “who we are,” the second weeks is “where are we in place and time,” the third week is “how we organize ourselves, the fourth week is, “how the world works,” the fifth week is “sharing the planet” and the final week is “how we express ourselves.”

Throughout the camp, kids explore the city, design model cities, visit a theater and visit various markets and festivals in the city.

“On Fridays, we do a share-out where all age groups come together and we kind of have a little assembly where we share what we learned during the week,” Sanders said.  

Last year, kids took a water taxi to Chinatown and on another day they visited the Field Museum.

“We don’t just stay right in the neighborhood,” Sanders said. “With the younger campers, we stay close to school, but for the older kids, we venture out on public transportation.”

In addition to the cultural diversity, Sanders said Camp GEMS is staffed by GEMS teachers and the ratio is five students to one teacher, ensuring the kids are learning as well as enjoying the city.

“It’s not just for GEMS students,” Sanders said. “We love that it brings in different people and different perspectives.”

A variety of other day and week camps are available for kids.

Sailing and STEM camp

The Chicago Park District is hosting its annual sailing and STEM camp in May, June and July.

Kids can learn to sail at Monroe Harbor, with no experience necessary. The camp is for 5th-8th grade students in Chicago and it requires a $250 donation, though low-income applicants can get in free. To apply for a spot, visit endeavourchicago.org.

The four day-sessions (Monday-Thursday) go beyond  sailing. Students will learn science, technology, engineering and math curriculum. The course opens May 4 and meets every Saturday at 9 a.m. A June camp runs from June 24 to Aug. 1.

Visit EndeavourChicago.org for more details and to apply online. Scholarships are available.

Urban Kayaks paddle and kayak camp

Urban Kayaks summer paddle and kayak camp kicks off July 29. The camp runs weekly from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and is aimed at kids ages 10 to 16. The course, at $550 per week with a 25 percent discount for siblings, is located at Monroe Harbor. For more information, visit urbankayaks.com or call 312-965-0035

Navy Pier’s Wiggleworms music program

While not a camp, Navy Pier is again hosting Wiggleworms, a free music program for children every Friday beginning June 21.

Wiggleworms, Old Town School of Folk Music’s early childhood music program, introduces young children and their families to a musical world. The program is at the Polk Brothers Park stage and it runs Fridays from 10 to 11:45 a.m.

Tails in the City celebrates 15 years in Streeterville area

(Published April 29)

By Elisa Shoenberger, staff writer

Tails in the City is celebrating 15 years of bringing dog accessories to the neighborhood.

The shop opened its doors in 2004 when owners Bruce Haas and Phillip Emigh

sought to start their own retail business. They decided on a luxury dog shop because they saw a need for high end dog items and Tails in the City was born at One East Delaware Place.

“We don’t offer anything that you need, we only offer things that you want,” said Philip Emigh.

They have $200 down snowsuits, sparkly bow ties, designer pet carriers, and even punny dog toys from Haute Diggity Dog —Chewie Vuitton and Woof Clicquot. They also have freshly baked goods in the shape of martini glasses and crowns that “fly off the shelves,” Emigh said.

They have a loyal following of neighborhood residents and they get business from tourists who go to the shop as a last stop before going home, according to Emigh.

Ani Sergi, a customer who has been shopping at Tails in the City since day one, explained that she loves the atmosphere and talking with the people at the shop. She notes that her dog, “loves to be there and she welcomes everybody. They give treats to the dogs.”

Emigh noted they’ve been popular with celebrities who are in town, such as Jennifer Hudson and Carrie Underwood. When Harpo Studios was in Chicago, producers sourced their goodies for their guests from the shop.

The store also gives back to the pet community. For the fourth years in a row, the dog store will host a fundraising event for Canine Companions for Independence, a nonprofit organization that trains and provides assistance dogs. Seasonally the store raises money for PAWS or the Anti-Cruelty Society through pet photographs with Santa or the Easter Bunny. They also host an annual halloween party and parade where pets and pet parents can win awards for best duo costume.

At the end of the day, the shop owners want the space to be be a fun place for people.

“Who wants to sell boring things? We want to sell fun things,” Emigh said. “Otherwise we’re competing with pet big box stores. We want to surprise our customers with what we have and make them happy.”

The bizarre, hate-filled history of Mother’s Day

(Published April 29, 2019)

By Jesse Wright, Staff Writer

The roots of Mother’s Day lie embedded in the blood-soaked soil of history.

Before President Woodrow Wilson recognized the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day in 1914, women had been fighting for the holiday since shortly after the Civil War.

According to National Geographic, Julia Ward Howe, author of the “Battle Hymn of the Republic,” suggested a Mothers’ Peace Day in 1872.

Initially, people celebrated the holiday by meeting in churches, social halls or other public places to sing, pray and read essays about peace.

Chicago was among a handful of cities to take up the tradition, and Chicagoans celebrated the holiday in June until 1913.

But that version of the holiday failed to gain much popularity outside of peace activists. By the turn of the 20th century, people suggested a more politically neutral holiday to honor mothers.

One of those early proponents was former football coach Frank Hering. In 1904 he announced at an Indianapolis gathering of The Fraternal Order of Eagles that the group needed to promote one Sunday each year as a day for mothers. The national organization picked up the challenge through its member clubs to champion a mother’s day in cities across the country.

The group still considers Hering as the father of Mother’s Day, much to the everlasting ire of Anna Jarvis.

Jarvis is generally considered the founder of Mother’s Day even though her mother, Ann Jarvis, cared for Civil War wounded on both sides of the war and tried to start a Mother’s Friendship Day for Civil War mothers, according to Mentalfloss.com.

The elder Jarvis died in 1905. The younger Jarvis worked furiously through letters and talks around the world to promote a day in honor of mothers. Her idea caught on among some elite supporters, including H. J. Heinz and John Wanamaker. Nearly 10 years later, in 1914, Congress passed a law recognizing the holiday and President Wilson signed it into law.

Even so, Jarvis couldn’t stand that Hering and his fraternal organization promoted Hering as the originator of Mother’s Day. In the 1920s she issued a statement claiming he “kidnapped” Mother’s Day, according to National Geographic.

Jarvis wrote that Hering was, “making a desperate effort to snatch from me the rightful title of originator and founder of Mother’s Day, established by me after decades of untold labor, time, and expense.”

For the rest of her life, she signed everything, “Anna Jarvis, founder of Mother’s Day.” By 1920 she was already souring on the holiday’s commercial aspects.

According to mentalfloss.com, white carnations were always part of Mother’s Day, but soon florists added other flower arrangements, card companies designed greeting cards and stores were promoting Mother’s Day gifts and candies.

Outraged, Jarvis wrote that these commercial industries were, “charlatans, bandits, pirates, racketeers, kidnappers and termites that would undermine with their greed one of the finest, noblest and truest movements and celebrations.”

She tried to get Mother’s Day trademarked, but the trademark office denied the request. FTD offered to share its profits with Jarvis, but this enraged her. In 1934 the post office issued a Mother’s Day stamp and this, too, infuriated her.

By Jarvis’ way of thinking, Mother’s Day should be celebrated with a handwritten letter to mom, and nothing more. Jarvis, it should be noted, had no children.

“A maudlin, insincere printed card or ready-made telegram means nothing except that you’re too lazy to write to the woman who has done more for you than anyone else in the world,” she wrote.

In later years, she had to be dragged from public Mother’s Day events and she was arrested for trying to stop the sale of carnations and finally she tried to have the holiday rescinded.

Jarvis died in a mental health institution in Pennsylvania in 1948. She had no money, though, and her bill was paid by a florists’ association.

A look at the numbers behind the Navy Pier fireworks


(Published April 29, 2019)

By Elisa Shoenberger, Staff Writer

With the warmer weather comes Navy Pier fireworks.

May 25 is the start of the annual Navy Pier fireworks and Melrose Pyrotechnics will again produce the weekly displays, just as they have for the past 15 years.

For the audience, it’s 10 minutes of fun filled with fire, smoke and dazzling colors all set to music. But the behind the scenes is real work and somebody has to do it. One of those somebodies is Jonathan Gesse, a soundtrack producer with Melrose Pyrotechnics.

Gesse said “a minimum of 30-hours preparation goes into each Navy Pier display, which includes everything from soundtrack design, choreography, labeling, packaging, setup, product testing and transportation.”

The day of the show, five technicians set up about 10 hours beforehand, including monitoring the equipment in advance of the show.

Each show is a “unique pyromusical experience,” Gesse said. “Our team of choreographers uses industry software to ‘script’ each display according to the musical soundtrack by listening to the music and building scenes of light and color.” Once the show is ready to start, Melrose sends a “coded radio signal from Navy Pier to the fireworks crew, which the firing computer receives and synchronizes itself to the music that plays through the speakers at Navy Pier.”

Melrose gets fireworks from all over the world including China, Italy and Spain. They use 500 new products each year and more than 1,400 feet of XLR cable for the shows.

Gesse said the heights achieved by fireworks depends on the diameter of the shell. Three- and four-inch shells will generally explode from about 300 to 400 feet in the sky, and 10 inch shells will rise to well over 10,000 feet in the air before they break.

“At Navy Pier, we use aerial shells ranging from two-and-a-half inches up to 10 inches in diameter,” Gesse said.

This year, there will be 31 firework performances, each Wednesday and Saturday from May 25 to Aug. 31 with additional shows July 4 and New Year’s Eve. Wednesday fireworks are at 9:30 p.m. and Saturdays are at 10:15 p.m., weather dependent.

The displays last 10 minutes while the July 4 and New Year’s Eve displays last 15 minutes. Last year, CBS reported that nearly 100,000 people attended the July 4 celebration and that the fireworks performance had 2,000 firework shells go off with “300 different effects.”

Stay inside and get outside through the MCA’s ‘The Great Outdoors’ performance piece this weekend

For the Streeterville News

(Published March 20, 2019)

The Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago will present “The Great Outdoors,” a performance by writer-director Annie Dorsen that takes place within an inflatable dome on the theater stage where the public can stretch out on mats for a journey through ‘inner space.’

A lone performer, Kaija Matiss, reads aloud comments culled from internet discussion boards 4chan and Reddit in the past 24 hours, giving voice to the thoughts of countless individuals tapping away at their keyboards in isolation. With a unique stellar star show designed by Dorsen in collaboration with Ryan Holsopples, “The Great Outdoors” connects ideas of infinity and the unknown to today’s networked, hyper-connected technologies, and reflects on the cosmic nature of the internet. The Great Outdoors takes place at the MCA from Thursday to Saturday, March 21-23, at 7:30 p.m., with an additional 2 pm show on Sunday, March 24.

“The Great Outdoors” is a performance that changes each time it takes place, using a stream of that day’s internet comments that are fed through an algorithm produced by Dorsen herself. The algorithm sorts messages by their density, and operates independently of human intervention, delivering a flood of personal and collective thoughts that the artist calls the ‘internet’s id’ – a projection of ourselves unrestrained by ego, and protected by anonymity.

The Great Outdoors” invites audiences to consider the internet as both ‘inner’ and ‘outer’ space, at once a digital reflection of personal life and a connection to the world beyond the body and its physical location. Dorsen describes the internet as “a new Romantic landscape where we can go exploring, as explorers did in the nineteenth century.” As audiences imagine the internet’s infinite possibilities, musician Sébastien Roux mixes a live score on stage, experimenting with electronic and ambient sounds inspired by the theory that the universe is always expanding.

“The Great Outdoors”takes place in the Edlis Neeson Theater at the MCA and seating is limited. Tickets are $30 and can be reserved at www.mcachicago.org or by calling the box office at 312-397-4010.

Chicago in winter is hot, hot, hot for tourists

By Elizabeth Czapski, Staff Writer

Winter in Chicago means one thing—cold. Chicago might not be Miami, but Chicago gets visitors even in the depths of winter.

The reasons are as varied as the visitors. Some come for conferences and others come for vacation, but one no matter what, the city seeks to welcome all winter tourists with warm smiles and plenty to do.

“People think of the city as being very cold and unfriendly, but actually the weather in Chicago can be great in the winter time, and there are great things to do,” Erik Grazetti, director of sales and marketing at the Loews Chicago Hotel, 455 N. Park Drive.

He explained that the city has done a good job of marketing itself as a destination for people in surrounding states who want to break out of winter’s “cabin fever” by offering a variety of activities like the Chicago Auto Show, St. Patrick’s Day celebrations, sporting events and concerts.

Colleen Sweitzer, marketing manager at the Fairmont Chicago Millennium Park, said in addition to events for the holidays, so much of Chicago’s culture involves “great indoor fun,” including museum exhibits, theater and music.

Once visitors do get there, there will always be a personal, smiling face at the ready. No matter what the reason or the season, Choose Chicago, the official marketing organization for the city, said their Chicago Greeter program pairs volunteer city greeters with individuals who may want a local to show them around.

The service is available all year long, except on major holidays and it could come in handy for those visitors who come to the city at the last minute and don’t have a set itinerary. This sort of a visit is more common in the winter time than some might expect. “Seventy or 80 percent of our business on the [winter] weekends comes from within about a four hour drive of the hotel,” Grazetti said. Local travelers, he said, can plan a trip more last-minute than someone who wants to plan a five or six-day trip. “Those types of people tend to go to the warm-weather destinations.”

“In the Midwest, we kind of hunker down, so a trip to Chicago is a nice change of pace and a fun getaway in the winter rather than hibernating until spring,” Sweitzer said. Fairmont Hotels & Resorts is based in Canada, and Sweitzer said the hotel sees many Canadian tourists in the winter as well.

“We’re warm here compared to a lot of places in Canada in the winter,” she said.

Still, fewer people are staying at Chicago hotels in the winter. Grazetti said from January to mid-March, the Loews sees a 60 percent room occupancy rate, compared to a 90 percent average during the warmer months. That’s good news for winter travelers as fewer people in the hotels means generally cheaper rooms. Grazetti added, however, that occupancy is up, even in the winter time, compared with eight or nine years ago.

Grazetti praised Choose Chicago, which has “done a really good job, particularly I’d say over the last five years or so, in really promoting Chicago as a winter destination, and we’ve definitely seen the impact of that,” he said.

Besides discounts and cabin fever, there’s something else that brings people to Chicago in the winter: conventions. Grazetti called Chicago a “conference town.”

“The hotel market in the city really kind of thrives on the convention business that is brought into McCormick place and some of the larger venues here,” he said.

Grazetti said conventions bring in about 1.2 million people per year, with about 15 percent of those people during the winter months. Despite lower hotel prices, organizations tend to avoid booking conferences in colder months when bad weather could shut down an airport, he said.

The American Student Dental Association took that risk and held its national leadership conference in Chicago in mid-November. Tatum Newbill, Matthew McLeod and Chantol Peterkin, dental students from Howard University in Washington, D.C. attended the conference.

Peterkin said she had been to Chicago during the winter and wasn’t worried about the weather. “If you have the time now, why not?” she said.

McLeod said the students discussed preparing for the weather the week before the conference. “I’m wearing layers right now,” he said. “I hear it’s nicer in the summer.”

Other winter conferences this year included the Radiological Society of North America’s (RSNA) which attracted tens of thousands of guests and the Muslim American Society’s annual national convention at the end of December, hosted about 12,000 attendees. Both conferences were set for McCormick Place.

Bob and Gretchen Montgomery, along with four travel companions, made the trek to Chicago from Dallas and Denver and were taking photos in Millennium Park on a snowy November day.


“We love Chicago,” Bob Montgomery said, adding the group had come to celebrate a birthday and an anniversary and to see Hamilton.

The weather in Chicago, they said, wasn’t much different from the weather in their home cities. “Weather shouldn’t be a hindrance to going somewhere, to have fun,” Gretchen Montgomery said.

To find out more about the Chicago Greeter program, call (312) 945-4231 or visit their website at www.chicagogreeter.com or visit the Choose Chicago website at www.choosechicago.com

1 2 3