Local doctor finds freedom, uses real medical innovation to kill in fiction novel

By Mat Cohen

In the last scene of the 1977 film “Annie Hall,” Woody Allen jokes most people can’t break from a rut if they need the means it’s providing.

Dr. Michael Young, a Streeterville resident, had a private urology practice from 1991 to 2017 and is thankful he wasn’t dependent on a proverbial chicken providing him eggs. This led Young to break free of the medical industry and write his two books, The Illness of Medicine and Consequence of Murder.

“If you are stuck, but you don’t have any options and you need the eggs, you’re still stuck,” Young said. “I had an opportunity to say goodbye—I financially was secure and was able to cut that chain. I have other interests, other abilities and the means to pursue them.

“So I took advantage of that.”

Young’s other interests include medical innovation, underwater photography, teaching, riding his bike along Lake Michigan and writing. At the peak of his game, as the head of two departments and with a private practice, Young stepped away for those interests.

“I just got fatigued with where medicine was going,” he said. “It’s not that I don’t enjoy it, I just don’t enjoy the environment in which we have to practice.”

Currently, he is the director of the division of innovation in the Department of Urology at the University of Illinois Chicago and has been on radio shows discussing the state of the medical industry.

His first book, Illness of Medicine, published February 2018, recounts his 33 years of experience in the medical field.

“I wanted patients to understand what physicians are going through and I wanted physicians to understand what patients are going through,” he said. “I wanted both to see the other side of the table.”

Consequence of Murder, a fictional story published in June, uses a HydroGel to kill evil. The gel, which Young developed in real life for about a year, changes its state based on temperature. Its original purpose was to hold kidney stones still for doctors to break them down easier. But when the Office of Technology Management found other work in that area, the HydroGel was used to fictitiously take away lives instead.

“I’ve done all this work and now I can’t do anything with it,” he said. “What do you do when you get upset? Well you say, ‘I’m going to kill somebody,’ figuratively. So I decided I was going to use this stuff to kill somebody. It was my venting.

“So, that’s the process of murder. It’s a little warped, I know, but this is how I think.”

Christian Luciano, Ph.D., is a colleague of Young’s at UIC was impressed Young was able to turn the book into a mystery.

“It’s amazing how this involved a mystery novel,” he said. “It’s an extraordinary complex thing and he makes it understandable. The perfect balance between facts and details, but while still keeping the essence of what it is.”

Young said fictional writing is more challenging than nonfiction. He is currently writing his third book with many of the same characters overlapping from his second. 
For more information, visit https://michaeljyoungmd.com/.

Streeterville CAPS meeting brings complaints of homelessness

At the Sept. 5 CAPS meeting in Streeterville, Residents complained of homeless people living in Streeterville parks and sleeping outside on Michigan Avenue and Chicago Avenue.

Officer Ramona Stovall said people couldn’t legally sleep in parks as they close at 9 p.m. and generally people can’t sleep on the sidewalks either.

“The public walkway is not supposed to be impeded,” she said. Officers can ask homeless people who are sleeping to “move on,” if they’re breaking a law.

Sgt. Christopher Schenck pointed out that being homeless isn’t against the law. Police can refer homeless people to social services, but police can’t compel anyone to go to a shelter.

“I don’t know what we’re going to do,” he said. “If they’re not going to impede the sidewalk and if they refuse our services, I don’t know what we’re going to do.”

At this point, a person alleged some homeless people use children to beg for money. Stovall said this could be illegal, depending on the circumstances.

“I’ve taken children away from parents,” she said. Stovall told residents to call the police if they believe children are being exploited.

Schenck said the police will take the kids and have them checked out at the hospital.

The next meeting will be 6 p.m. on Nov. 7 at Access Living, 115 W Chicago Ave.

Preservation Chicago aims to save the fabric of Streeterville


(Published Aug. 31, 2019)

By Elisa Shoenberger

Preservation Chicago champions Chicago’s legendary architecture and is working to preserve the character of neighborhoods. The nonprofit is behind recent efforts to landmark 15 post-fire mansions in Streeterville and River North. These buildings include 42 and 44-46 E. Superior Street and the building that houses restaurant Les Nomades (222 E. Ontario).

Ward Miller, Executive Director of Preservation Chicago, explains that “the proposed Near North landmark district has received preliminary landmark status. It has received a report from the Department of Planning and Development Preservation Division.” The process can take more than a year but sometimes “a demolition permit is expedited by three months.” 

The three buildings on Superior had an active demolition permit, which helped precipitate these landmarking efforts. To be eligible, the buildings have to meet at least two designation criteria as well as integrity criteria; in this case, there was enough historic significance to help make the case for landmarking efforts.

Part of the landmarking process requires consent of the building’s owners who have 45 days or of no more than 120 days with an extension to make a decision in accordance with the Chicago Landmarks Ordinance.  That period ends on November 4th, according to Peter Strazzabosco, Deputy Commissioner, Chicago Department of Planning and Development. If any owners reject the proposal, there will be a public hearing.

Founded in 2001, Preservation Chicago has had their share of wins and loses; Prentice Women’s Hospital, located at 333 E. Superior, was demolished in 2013 despite efforts of advocates like Preservation Chicago. The building had been built by Bertrand Goldberg, who was also behind Marina City. 

But Miller explains that the loss of the building “did force Northwestern and the city to have robust discussion about protecting the historic buildings that form that Chicago Avenue wall” including the Montgomery Ward Memorial Building, Wieboldt Hall, and the Northwestern Pritzker School of Law. However, Miller explains that the nonprofit is not against development but wants to “encourage sensitive development.” 

“We want to see buildings preserved and to avoid bigger taller buildings that have an impact on the quality of life,” Miller explains. These smaller buildings help keep the character of the neighborhood and provide homes for local businesses. 

“These buildings give a sense of neighborhood from another age and add to the charm and vision of Michigan Avenue,” Miller says. Miller questions: “Are we killing the golden goose? by overdeveloping Streeterville and River North.

Preservation Chicago will continue in its work to help preserve the character of Chicago in Streeterville and all the other neighborhoods in Chicago.

Streeterville park offers green oasis due, in part, to innovative deception

(Published July 31, 2019)

By Jesse Wright

As residents move into the newly-opened One Bennett Park luxury skyscraper, the building’s flagship amenity—the two-acre Bennett Park—prepares to open Aug. 6.

By all expectations, the park is shaping up to be equal in its design and ambition as the skyscraper next door. The park, designed by landscape architect Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, the firm behind Maggie Daley Park in New Eastside, seems to offer something for everyone.

“Bennett Park includes an inspired children’s play bowl with innovative playground equipment, two dog runs, a lawn bowl for gathering and a shady grove and meandering pathways with native plantings, flowering trees and design elements such as stone formations,” said Annie McDonell, the director of marketing for project developer Related Midwest. 

“[The park is] open space that serves as a respite within the city for all generations,” McDonell said. She added that the park, “enriches the neighborhood, builds community, and enhances the health and wellness of those living at One Bennett Park.”

But the beauty belies the brains behind the project because the park is as every bit as modern as its namesake luxury skyscraper and this oasis owes more to engineering than mother nature. 

Constrained on one side by Illinois Street and on all other sides by a high rise, the landscape architects relied on design to turn the rectangular plot into a park.

“The undulating topography and earthen mounds not only serve as a strong contrast to the flatness of the public streets and sidewalks, they add dimension to the space,” explained McDonnell. “This dimensional element of the design incorporates abundant plantings and rolling topography along the edges of every pathway and around the central lawn bowl, giving the park a lush and spacious feel.”

The rolling landscape covered by prairie grasses and bushes are also something of a design trick. Dig down deep enough and there’s a parking garage. What appears at first as green prairie is actually a garage roof, meaning developers had to create a lightweight prairie facsimile. The small, rolling hills? They’re fake. 

“To make the undulating topography that gives the park its character, horticultural soil was piled atop lightweight styrofoam structures, which are eco-friendly and very durable,” McDonell said. “By using lightweight foam as the underlying structure to create rolling topography, we kept the soil limits low, allowing more bandwidth to add plantings and trees and still stay under the weight limits of what the garage structure can support.”

Cookie DŌ pop up comes to Navy Pier

(Published June 30, 2019)

By Angela Gagnon – Staff Writer

New York’s popular edible cookie dough has come to Chicago. 

Cookie DŌ Confections set up a small stand at the base of the Navy Pier Ferris wheel so Chicagoans and visitors can enjoy edible cookie dough treats through Labor Day. 

Ryan Manley, a filmmaker from Atlanta, wanted to check out the trending treat in New York, and he was pleasantly surprised to find the pop up Cookie DŌ kiosk at Navy Pier while visiting Chicago to see “Hamilton.” 

“It’s really good,” Manley said. “I thought it would be small, but it’s very filling. I’m glad I got to try it here.”

The abbreviated menu features the raw Cookie DŌ, cookie dough ice cream, cookie sandwiches and ice cream “SanDos.” 

“We use a pasteurized egg product and a heat-treated ready-to-eat flour which make all of our desserts safe to consume just as they are—unbaked,” founder Kristen Tomlan said. 

Cookie DŌ ships nationwide. To purchase  flavors outside of what is served at the pop up, visit cookiedonyc.com. 

The Cookie DŌ pop up at Navy Pier is open Sundays-Thursdays from 10 a.m.-10 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m.-midnight, weather permitting.

Navy Pier’s free wellness series, Summer Fitness returns to Navy Pier

(Published May 30, 2019)

For the third consecutive year, Navy Pier visitors will have the opportunity to participate in the Pier’s popular outdoor wellness series, Summer Fitness Supported by LifeStart, featuring free workout sessions and yoga classes every Tuesday evening from June 4 through Aug. 20 on the Polk Bros Park Performance Lawn. Led by certified instructors, the series offers fun, action-packed cardio, strength and conditioning exercises during Rush Hour Workouts, followed by stress-reducing poses to calm the mind and energize the spirit during Sunset Yoga.

Rush Hour Workouts include high-energy Werq and Zumba exercises, and are held from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., followed by Sunset Yoga’s Vinyasa Flow classes from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., set to the zenful backdrop of the Chicago skyline at sunset. Guests are encouraged to bring their own mats to the guided yoga sessions, which string postures together and use breathing techniques to create seamless, flowing movement.

For a complete listing of workouts, visit navypier.org.

Northwestern University police to patrol in Streeterville

Northwestern University Police have agreed to expand their scope of operations in Streeterville after talks with aldermen Brendan Reilly and Brian Hopkins.

The officers agreed to patrol the area bounded by East Chestnut Street, East Ontario Street, North Michigan Avenue and North Lake Shore Drive. There are approximately five officers and two patrol cars dispatched throughout Northwest University’s patrol boundaries 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

As part of the agreement, the campus police will act as first responders to 911 calls for incidents on the public right of way. Additionally, university police will now be issuing traffic citations within their boundaries.

“Downtown Chicago, and Streeterville in particular, is home to thousands of businesses and residents, as well as some of the world’s most iconic cultural attractions,” said Second Ward alderman Hopkins. “It’s crucial that we collectively work to ensure their safety and security. I’m proud to join Alderman Reilly, CPD and NUP to develop collaborative, creative solutions that will ultimately lead to enhanced safety measures in the Streeterville community.”

New rooftop lounge, Offshore, opens at Navy Pier

A new, 36,000 square feet rooftop lounge called Offshore opened at Navy Pier in May. Developers say the deck is the largest rooftop lounge in the country. It is on the third floor of the Pier’s Festival Hall and it will be open all year long.

The deck is glass-enclosed in parts and offers firepits and areas for viewing Lake Michigan and the city. A kitchen serves American cuisine and is led by chef MIchael Shrader.

Acron Group developed the rooftop lounge and they plan to add a four-star hotel at the Pier and a deck.

Shedd Aquarium, Lincoln Park Zoo seeking volunteers to care for animals, the earth


Join the Shedd Aquarium, Lincoln Park Zoo, and the Brookfield Zoo for Party for the Planet Spring into Action, going on now through June 8  (World Oceans Day). Sponsored by the Disney Conservation Fund, in partnership with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, the series of events will provide local communities with opportunities to volunteer and take action for animals and our planet.

The Shedd Aquarium and local Zoos will host a series of volunteer stewardship events, called Family Volunteer Days, throughout the Chicagoland area where volunteers can come together to remove litter from Chicago’s Lake Michigan and Chicago River coastlines, plant native plant species, remove invasive plants, and help collect data through citizen science projects.

Volunteers will receive special prizes for participating, such as reusable water bottles, and tickets to visit the zoos or aquarium and more.  

Dates and locations for the Family Volunteer Days are at sheddaquarium.org.

A look at the numbers behind the Navy Pier fireworks


(Published April 29, 2019)

By Elisa Shoenberger, Staff Writer

With the warmer weather comes Navy Pier fireworks.

May 25 is the start of the annual Navy Pier fireworks and Melrose Pyrotechnics will again produce the weekly displays, just as they have for the past 15 years.

For the audience, it’s 10 minutes of fun filled with fire, smoke and dazzling colors all set to music. But the behind the scenes is real work and somebody has to do it. One of those somebodies is Jonathan Gesse, a soundtrack producer with Melrose Pyrotechnics.

Gesse said “a minimum of 30-hours preparation goes into each Navy Pier display, which includes everything from soundtrack design, choreography, labeling, packaging, setup, product testing and transportation.”

The day of the show, five technicians set up about 10 hours beforehand, including monitoring the equipment in advance of the show.

Each show is a “unique pyromusical experience,” Gesse said. “Our team of choreographers uses industry software to ‘script’ each display according to the musical soundtrack by listening to the music and building scenes of light and color.” Once the show is ready to start, Melrose sends a “coded radio signal from Navy Pier to the fireworks crew, which the firing computer receives and synchronizes itself to the music that plays through the speakers at Navy Pier.”

Melrose gets fireworks from all over the world including China, Italy and Spain. They use 500 new products each year and more than 1,400 feet of XLR cable for the shows.

Gesse said the heights achieved by fireworks depends on the diameter of the shell. Three- and four-inch shells will generally explode from about 300 to 400 feet in the sky, and 10 inch shells will rise to well over 10,000 feet in the air before they break.

“At Navy Pier, we use aerial shells ranging from two-and-a-half inches up to 10 inches in diameter,” Gesse said.

This year, there will be 31 firework performances, each Wednesday and Saturday from May 25 to Aug. 31 with additional shows July 4 and New Year’s Eve. Wednesday fireworks are at 9:30 p.m. and Saturdays are at 10:15 p.m., weather dependent.

The displays last 10 minutes while the July 4 and New Year’s Eve displays last 15 minutes. Last year, CBS reported that nearly 100,000 people attended the July 4 celebration and that the fireworks performance had 2,000 firework shells go off with “300 different effects.”

Mag Mile Marriott to unveil new lounge area with major upgrades

(Published April 2, 2019)

By Jesse Wright, Staff Writer

After months of construction hidden behind plywood walls, the Chicago Marriott Downtown, 540 N. Michigan Ave., announced it will unveil its new lounge area April 25.

The former Rush Bar will be Reviver and it completes a five-year multimillion renovation project that included room, lobby, fitness center and event space upgrades. Besides décor, Reviver will also offer a new food and drinks menu.

According to a press release, the property owners wanted Reviver to offer tourists and residents a space that reflects Chicago through time.

To that end, Reviver will offer contemporary cocktails based on significant periods in Chicago, a selection of Chicago and Midwestern craft beer, a curated modern wine program and an elevated street food menu that reflects bustling Michigan Avenue indoors. Reviver will be open daily from 11 a.m. to 2 a.m.  

“We want guests to take a personalized journey through Chicago’s great historical periods by enjoying our contemporary interpretation of the beverages that would have been available throughout the history of our city,” bar manager Bill Nykaza said. “From the frontier pubs discovered by Marquette and Joliet, through the modern resurgence of the Windy City, enjoy our liquid tour of Chicago’s story that shakes up the past and crafts authenticity.”

Seating options at Reviver will include 28 seats at the bar for lunch, dinner and happy hour. The bar’s seating will extend throughout the lobby—including of 172 seats across the communal high-top tables, couches, and chairs—and semi-private space known as the “library” that can accommodate up to 50 people reception-style.

Whitespace Interiors, a Chicago firm, designed the space.

According to a press release, the name Reviver comes from the family of cocktails historically referred to as Corpse Revivers, drinks intended as a remedy to provide restorative powers. The name also reflects the reinvention of the Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile.

The Mag Mile Marriott’s new lounge, Revival, will debut April 25. Photo courtesy Marriott

A guide to the best best brunches downtown


(Published April 1, 2019)

By Stephanie Racine, Staff Writer

Easter Sunday is a day of church service and reflection for some. Besides church, Easter is a great day for brunch with many restaurants offering special brunch menus. Chicago has an array of brunch options, including classics, or something new never tried before, here are the top picks in Streeterville and New Eastside.

Streeterville

Yolk

355 E Ohio St

Eatyolk.com

One of many chain locations throughout the city, Yolk is located at the corner of Grand and McClurg. Open 6am-3pm on weekdays, 7am on weekends. Yolk has plenty of egg-based options, including build your own skillets, scramblers, or omelets. They also have a variety of burgers to choose from, for those who prefer lunch at brunch.

Hot Tip: They are BYOB!  Yolk offers fresh orange juice for mimosas and Bloody Mary mix.

Kanela Breakfast Club

502 E Illinois St

Kanela, open 8am to 3pm every day, is a brunch spot with Greek influences has options for every type of brunchgoer. They have vegan options, like an impossible burger, avocado toast, or chia seed pudding. Their vegetarian options include egg white omelets with spicy feta. For everyone else, they have specialty options like, a pork and jam sandwich and a crab cake benedict.

Hot Tip: Try any of the authentic Greek options, especially loukoumades, which are honey doughnuts!

Beatrix

671 N St Clair St

Beatrixrestaurants.com

Beatrix is an all-day restaurant, which offers breakfast during the week until 11am and brunch on the weekends, 8am-3pm. They have an assortment of brunch cocktails, juices, coffees, and teas. “The New Healthy” restaurant has quinoa cakes, a poke bowl, and a chia cereal bowl.

Hot Tip: They have a bakery and coffee bar for quick fixes. The bakery includes gluten-free options.

Hampton Social

164 E. Grand Ave

Hamptonsocial.com

Newly opened in Fall 2018, Hampton Social in Streeterville has brunch on the weekends 10am to 3pm. Their East Coast-inspired brunch includes clam chowder, yellowtail ceviche, and shrimp tacos. Their terrace is covered for colder days, but will be open once it warms up.

Hot Tip: Make a reservation on OpenTable to secure your brunch spot!

The Signature Room

875 N. Michigan Ave.

Signatureroom.com

Families and friends can enjoy a gourmet brunch buffet and a visit with the Easter Bunny in the sky on the 95th floor. Easter brunch is served from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on April 21 for $80 per adult, and $35 per child aged 4-12, excluding tax and gratuity. Children under the age of three eat for free. Pricing includes one glass of Signature Room Sparkling Wine and choice of soda, juice, coffee, and tea. The restaurant opens for regular dinner service from 6-9:30 p.m. Reservations are required and can be made by calling 312-787-9596.

Hot Tip: The Easter brunch at The Signature Room features live piano music, photo opportunities with the Easter Bunny, and a spread of chilled seafood, salad, charcuterie, fresh fruit, soup, and more. Guests have access to a chef-attended carving station, made-to-order entrées, and a dessert buffet.

The Signature Room’s Easter buffet features food as well as scenery. Photo courtesy The Signature Room

E.T.A Restaurant and Bar

455 N. Park Drive

Etarestaurantandbar.com

E.T.A., located inside Loew’s Hotel, E.T.A. is a great spot for residents as well as visitors. E.T.A. offers diners a classic, wood-ensconced dining room meant to evoke classic Chicago’s taverns, even while the food is modern, fresh and locally sourced.

Hot Tip: While E.T.A. always offers breakfast lunch and dinner options, for Easter, E.T.A. has a special brunch menu available 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. that’s $45 per person or $17 for children 5-12 and free for kids under 4. Brunch comes with a chance for kids to decorate Easter eggs, a take away gift for the table and a free bloody mary or mimosa.

New Eastside

City that Brunches (NES)

By Stephanie Racine, Staff Writer

Easter Sunday is a day of church service and reflection for some. Besides church, Easter is a great day for brunch with many restaurants offering special brunch menus. Chicago has an array of brunch options, including classics, or something new never tried before, here are the top picks in New Eastside and nearby.

Eggy’s Diner

333 E. Benton Place

Eggysdiner.com

Eggy’s is a New Eastside mainstay, with an “urban comfort food” tagline. Located in the Park at Lakeshore East, Eggy’s is open 7:30am-3pm. Eggy’s offers a variety of brunch and lunch options, both unique and classic. With a focus on eggs, patrons can order a classic benedict or combo; or enjoy novelties like chilaquiles or breakfast poutine.

Hot tip: The chicken and waffles is a signature specialty that includes a half a fried chicken!

Wildberry

130 E. Randolph Street

Wildberrycafe.com

Wildberry is a popular destination for tourists and residents alike in Prudential Plaza, open every day 6:30am-2pm. There is an assortment of pancakes, crepes, waffles, and French toast to choose from. Waffles can be done gluten free and both savory and sweet crepes are available. Their signature berry bliss includes fresh berries, mascarpone, vanilla anglaise, and blackberry coulis.

Hot Tip: There is often a long wait at Wildberry during peak hours on weekends. Get in line virtually via Yelp, but make sure you arrive 10-15 minutes before your seat time. Sometimes they’re early!

About Last Knife

168 North Michigan Avenue

alkchicago.com

About Last Knife is the restaurant inside the Hotel Julian at Michigan and Randolph with brunch availabilities every day until 2pm. The steakhouse offers timeless steak and eggs, but adds twists like the beef wellington benedict that comes with béarnaise sauce.  

Hot Tip: Enjoy steakhouse classics during brunch times as well—they have beef wellington, filet, or hanger steak available.  

Cindy’s

12 S Michigan Ave

Cindysrooftop.com

Cindy’s, located in the Chicago Athletic Association Hotel, is a rooftop brunch destination. They have an open-air terrace, with great views of Millennium Park and the lake. Brunch is available on weekends, 10am-2pm. The menu includes platters, which are shareable between 3-4 people. Platter options include pancakes, lox and bagels, and oysters on the half shell.

Hot Tip: They have curated cocktails for an alcohol-infused brunch!

New naturopathic practice offers alternatives for those with chronic disease

(Published April 1, 2019)

By Jesse Wright for Haven Chicago

People with chronic disease may have learned to live in discomfort, but two new naturopathic doctors practicing in Streeterville say they can help.

Doctors Kolby Ourada and Alex Orton recently opened Haven Chicago at 233 E. Erie where they serve patients from across the city.

These unique services are the first of their kind in Chicago, but based on the patients they have seen, the two believe there is a need for their services. Ourada said most of their patients have been trying to get better for years.

“The majority of our patients have some kind of chronic disease, like gastrointestinal problems or joint pain or auto immune conditions or some other chronic illness,” he said. “We’re finding the majority of the patients we’ve seen, they’ve tried the traditional route. Our role is to empower the patient to establish the conditions for health that will allow them to heal.”

For someone suffering with a chronic illness, Ourada recommends a 90-day-intensive program that includes a thorough assessment of nutritional deficiencies, organ dysfunction, and lifestyle behaviors. Orton points out however, the treatment isn’t a one-time thing. It is most assuredly not just a pills for symptoms, and it requires work from the patient.

“This is a transformation health program so people can experience significant healing in three months, but the purpose is to empower the person to continue to heal outside the office,” Orton said. “True holistic medicine should be patient centered. They’re doing a lot of work on their own, changing the way they eat and changing the way they live. It’s different than just taking pills and not changing anything in your life. We teach people how to implement changes and support them so they can maintain their health for years to come.”

Kolby said many health issues are due to years of neglect or ignorance.

“After a certain time, if you’re not living within the laws of health then the physiological function of your body starts to break down,” he explained.

Orton said they also offer a full range of services and treatments for anyone interested in getting healthy, including nutritional consultations for anyone interested in wellness.

“Naturopathic medicine is very different from conventional medicine where there are silos of specialties,” Orton said. “When you’re approaching the body holistically, you’re getting a more individualized approach that focuses on the individual person, not their disease. Many people are just managing their condition with drugs, plateauing, maybe even getting worse. … We provide the tools and the empowerment so people can feel better and work towards getting off their medications.”

To find out more about Haven Chicago, visit their website, havenholistichealth.com.

Naturopath doctors Kolby Ourada and Alex Orton are ready to offer help to Streeterville residents with longtime ailments. Photo courtesy Alex Orton

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