New Eastside News moves into Carr Workplaces

By Jesse Wright, Staff Writer

New Eastside News has new offices at Carr Workplaces.

Carr Workplaces, a national coworking office space provider, rents flexible workspaces at 25 locations across the US. The Chicago location at the Aon Center, 200 E. Randolph St., was a good fit for the New Eastside paper.

“As we grow our brand and expand our coverage downtown, it made sense for us to move into a central space, and I wanted that to be in New Eastside, where the original paper was founded,” New Eastside News publisher Elaine Hyde said.

Hyde found the professional environment and flexible plans appealing. “We can pay for the space as we use it or choose to rent a dedicated office or meeting room as needed,” she said.

Jamie Janata, general manager of Carr Workplaces at the Aon Center, said those are common reasons people pick Carr.

“We appeal to the sharp, entrepreneurial professional that knows service has a value all of its own,” Janata said. “Our client base are leaders in sectors such as law, financial services, technology, marketing and media.”

The Workplaces’ affordability is a boon to businesspeople. “Our idea is that a professional workspace should be accessible to everyone,” Janata said. Pricing packages come with a lot of flexibility.

Coworking spaces, office suites and meeting rooms can be reserved for an hour, a day or rented on longer leases. Pricing begins at $35 for three hours in a shared space in the Cafe. Clients get internet access, printers, coffee, tea and water. Possible add-ons include mailboxes and phone lines with answering service. Carr provides perks such as fresh-baked cookies every Friday, access to office concierge services and a dedicated support team. The facility also provides an opportunity to network with other professionals.

Hyde explained that the move made sense for her team. “We depend on freelancers and writers who need to touch down throughout the day. I am pleased that we can now provide them with a quiet work spot. It makes it easier for us to cover local news and for our readers and advertisers to reach us.”

Janata pointed out that no matter who uses the spaces, her office concierge team is on hand to assist them with anything they may need.

“Carr Workplaces delivers the same level of concierge service you expect from a luxury hotel in a coworking setting,” Janata said. “Our clients tell us that it’s Carr Workplaces’ five-star hospitality that separates us from the competition. My team and I are really driven by a passion to deliver for our clients and to be the extension of their business.”

To find out more about Carr Workplaces, visit carrworkplaces.com or call 312-577-7600.

Send mail to New Eastside News, 200 E. Randolph St., Suite 5100, Chicago, IL 60601.

[Carr team members Vanessa Campos (left), General Manager, Jamie Janata and Giovanny Avila. Photo by Elizabeth Czapski]

BOB USE: Carr_Vanessa_Jamie_Giovanny_ElizabethCzapski_012319

[Carr Workplaces offer a variety of spaces, including open office setups, private meeting rooms and boardroom facilities. Photo courtesy Carr Workplaces.] (use the board room photo).

Mister Rogers documentary to air on PBS in February

Staff reports

(Published Jan. 16)

Fans of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood will get a treat Feb. 9.

That Saturday, WTTW11, Chicago’s public broadcasting station, will air “Won’t you be my Neighbor,” a hit documentary film about Fred Rogers, the host of the hit childrens television show.

The film highlights Rogers’ pioneering contributions to public television and children’s programming, namely promoting kindness and tolerance. It premiered at the Sundance Film Festival last year and has been nominated for numerous awards.

 The show aired on PBS stations around the country for decades and generations of adults watched the show as kids.

A Starbucks roastery could could offer a better brew of retail on Mag Mile

By Jesse Wright, Staff Writer

On Michigan Avenue, the old cliché is true: the only constant is change.

As online stores continue to hurt brick and mortar retailers, churn on Mag Mile is near constant, with Tommy Bahama and Forever 21 being only the most recent announced closings.

In December, the Chicago Architecture Center hosted an evening conversation with a panel of Chicago retail experts to discuss the continuing promise of the Magnificent Mile and how, even in a virtual world, creativity could save the day—and the bottom line—of brick and mortar stores.

Much of the conversation centered on Starbucks’ plan to this year transform the old four-story Crate and Barrel store into a massive roastery, a high-end coffee space that is poised to be a café with major cache. It’s a gamble designers hope will pay off with a new type of store that’s as much an experience as it is a selling space.

“Things change, nothing is permanent, and if something is genuinely out of place on this street it will get replaced,” explained David Stone, a landlord and tenant representative in the downtown area.

Stone said the whole of the street reflects changing trends—and that’s a good thing, as it keeps the area relevant and vital. One trend, Stone said, is windows. Over the last few decades, more retailers have transformed building facades with windows, giving the shopping district a more open, airy feel.

One building that typifies this is the Crate and Barrel outlet.

After 27 years, the retailer shuttered its Michigan Avenue flagship store in January 2018. Still, whatever retail trends ended a home décor store haven’t touched the aesthetic appeal of the store’s face—a massive, bright and open façade featuring more windows than brick and mortar.

Jay Longo, principal designer at the firm Solomon Cordwell Buenz, said the new roastery on Michigan Avenue will be as daring as a four-story, glass-paneled home décor store was in 1990. He expects it will keep the area relevant to a new generation of shoppers who are as prone to shop online as they are in any brick and mortar space.

Longo pointed out that the Crate and Barrel store’s design on Michigan Avenue was unique in 1990, and that is still an asset.

“It set a lot of trends that other buildings on Michigan Avenue have followed,” he said.  

He pointed out it’s not a virtual space; it is a space for people, and that means it’s a space for experiences. Longo said a roastery is a manufacturing facility as much as a café, and the combination is an experience shoppers can’t get anywhere else.

“The idea that brick and mortar is more of an experience than simply retail is definitely what the roastery is all about,” he said.

“Retailers are trying to build brand loyalty and that’s hard to do in cyberspace,” Stone said. “That’s the biggest attraction to brick and mortar.”

Program moderator Cheryl Durst, executive vice-president and CEO of the International Interior Design Association, put it in simple terms. No matter the age and no matter the trends, humans want to be wowed.

“Human beings need to be captivated,” she said.

Stellar astronomical events in 2019

By Stephanie Racine, Staff Writer

Look, up in the sky—it’s a bird, it’s a plane it’s … something you might never see again!

And it’s coming this year to a night sky near you.

Michelle Nichols, Director of Public Observing at the Adler Planetarium, offered some insight on what astronomical events to be on the lookout for in 2019. Here are the astronomical events that have significant importance to earthlings.

·      Dec. 31–January: New Horizons Spacecraft flyby of Ultima Thule, a Kuiper Belt object. Pictures will be visible from NASA.

·      Jan. 3: China’s Chang’e 4 lander/rover lands on the far side of the moon to study its surface and subsurface.

·      Jan. 3–4: Quadrantid Meteor Shower, visible without moonlight interference. Head to a dark place to view.

·      Jan. 17: SpaceX uncrewed test of its future commercial crewed Dragon spacecraft.

·      Jan. 20: Lunar eclipse, visible from 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m.

·      Jan. 20–26: Venus and Jupiter are close together and visible. Observable right before sunrise in the east. Jupiter is slightly less dim.

·      Feb. 17–19: Venus and Saturn are close together and visible. Observable right before sunrise in the east. Saturn is slightly less dim.

·      March: Boeing uncrewed test for the future crewed Starliner spacecraft.

·      May 6–7: Eta Aquarid Meteor Shower, visible with little moon interference. Head to a dark place to view.

·      June: SpaceX crewed test of Dragon spacecraft.

·      August: Boeing crewed test flight of Starliner spacecraft.

·      Aug. 12–13: Perseid Meteor Shower, the light from the moon will interfere, but could still be visible in a dark place.

·      Nov. 11: Transit of Mercury between the earth and the sun. For safe viewing, head to the Adler to view on telescopes with sun filters.

·      Dec. 13–14: Geminid Meteor Shower, the light from the moon will interfere, but could still be visible in a dark place.

·      Throughout 2019: Parker Solar Probe will pass the sun a couple times and send information back to Earth about the sun’s atmosphere.

·      Throughout 2019: Juno Spacecraft orbits around Jupiter and sends information back to Earth.  

For more information about these or other astronomical events, visit the Adler Planetarium at 1300 Lake Shore Drive or their website, www.adlerplanetarium.org.

What’s new at the Christkindlmarket

By Elizabeth Czapski | Staff Writer

Since 1996, the Christkindlmarket in Chicago has been delighting visitors with holiday food and wares with European flair. Modeled after the famous Christmas market in Nuremberg, Germany, Chicago’s version hosts vendors from Illinois, Germany and even as far away as Bethlehem and Nepal. This year’s market offers a mixture of the familiar with some new additions.

Here’s what’s new this year, according to Kate Bleeker, director of expansion and market development for Christkindlmarket Chicago.

The Mugs
Christkindlmarket’s signature mugs have become a collector’s item over the years, and this year the market will offer three-packs of mugs representing each of the market’s locations—Chicago, Naperville and Milwaukee. Individual mugs are also for sale; fill one with Glühwein to warm yourself up. For kids, there’s a special “Oma” (Grandma) snowman mug.

The Vendors
More than 50 vendors from all over the world will be at the market selling handcrafted pieces, Christmas decorations, food and beverages. New this year is a pop-up booth that will rotate vendors every few days to give guests a unique experience every time they visit.

Who’s hungry?
Cheese lovers rejoice! Food vendor Brunkow Cheese will be offering an indulgent new food item—Raclette sandwiches. Raclette cheese is melted, then spread onto fresh bread and finished with the toppings of your choice. Look for it at the Baked Cheese Haus booth.

This year, Christkindlmarket Chicago is partnering with Hannah’s Bretzel. The sandwich chain will have its own “Official Sandwich of the Christkindlmarket,” and the market’s souvenir mugs will be available for purchase at all Hannah’s Bretzel Chicago locations.

For a full list of vendors and events, see Christkindlmarket.com.

 

Mashtini a smash in a glass at Shoreham

By Jesse Wright | Staff Writer

 

They’re fun, they’re popular, they’re served in a martini glass—and they won’t get you drunk.

They’re mashtinis, boutique mashed potatoes and in late November residents of the Shoreham at Lakeshore East gathered for a mashtini mixer set to holiday music. Chelsea McMurry, the marketing coordinator for the Shoreham’s property management group, said the mixer is part of a series of regular events offered to residents.

“It’s something we wanted to do to improve moral and retention,” McMurry said. She added that the Shoreham as well as the Tides, a sister property at the Lakeshore East, are part of a community and regular social mixers can help foster that feeling.

“We’re looking forward to having more of these events,” McMurry said. “It’s nice to do something to say thank you and keep our residents here longer.”

For December, the Shoreham will offer a holiday mixer Dec. 20 featuring appetizers, skewers, a beer and wine bar, deserts and a DJ. The event will begin at 5:30 p.m.

With dozens of residents filtering in and out, grabbing martini glasses filled with either mashed white potatoes or sweet potatoes, McMurry called the evening a success.

Two residents, Sophia Arteaga and Frank Arteaga, praised the mixer. The Arteagas said they attend Shoreham events regularly.

“We’ve been to a few other events that were here and we generally loved them,” said Frank.

A look inside the wonderful windows at Macy’s

By Jesse Wright | Staff Writer

 

The weather’s cold. Snow flurries dance through the crisp air.

Even so, a crowd of people gathers on State Street, pausing to peer into windows on State Street.

The windows at Macy’s attract tourists and Chicagoans because whether it is a first-time visit or a longtime tradition, there’s something in those windows everyone wants to see.

“We come every year,” said Karen Rivera, who visited the windows with her husband Aqui and their granddaughter Amelia.

“We used to bring her father when he was a boy,” Karen explained.

But no matter how many times they come, what most people don’t see—what they can’t see—is the planning. Brian Peluso, the store’s visual manager, is the man behind the windows. This is Peluso’s first year as the visual manager for the State Street store, though he has 20 years’ worth of experience as assistant visual manager at the Macy’s in Columbus, Ohio.

Over the years, Peluso’s come to understand what these displays mean to people, both locals and tourists alike. Even though Christmas window displays take up a small amount of time and space in the Macy’s year, they’re a big deal.

It’s a lot of work getting folks coming back, year after year, for generations.

“The planning and execution process can take anywhere from nine months to a year,” Peluso wrote in an email. “Usually once the holiday windows are unveiled for the season, the brainstorming begins for the next year’s windows.”

Macy’s is a chain, so the store on State Street is part of a larger, national conversation that includes themes. After the stores agree on a look, the decorations are shipped out.

“This year’s window displays were packed and shipped in 20 pallets/crates made up of 15 double-length and five standard-sized skids,” Peluso wrote. “Also, we typically use about 50-60 pounds of fake snow in each year’s displays.”

The installation team consists of four or five people, and Peluso’s visual design team includes four people.hey add the finishing touches.

When Pelusa is designing the windows, he has to bear in mind the history of the tradition. He explained the store has shown displays since the 1870s—and over those years, they have developed quite a reputation.

“Macy’s was the first store to feature holiday windows created for the pure fun and joy of the season and, with that, began a tradition that still lives on today in numerous cities including New York, Chicago, Boston, Washington, D.C., San Francisco and Salt Lake City,” Peluso said.

“In Chicago specifically, we’re celebrating the 51st anniversary of our annual holiday window display at Macy’s on State Street.”

But that doesn’t mean the display itself is old. While some of the iconography like Santa may remain consistent, Peluso said the general themes do change.

“Each year a few new elements are added,” he said. “This year, we are excited to continue to celebrate all the Reasons to Believe.”

Each window also has its own theme and color palette, though there is at least one constant feature used to tie the all the displays together visually.

“Borders are placed around the windows to add to the overlying theme and to reflect Macy’s particular branding style,” Peluso said, adding that so much work and care goes into the windows, he understands why they attract people. There’s a lot to take in, and he has some advice on how to do it right.

“There are so many meticulous details in each window—from the sculpting of the caricatures, to the props, to the backdrops and more,” he wrote. “I’d recommend that viewers get up close to the glass and look at every inch. Then step back, so they’ll see the small details start to pop out, showing how exciting the entire window is.”

Finally, for anyone looking to spruce up their own windows—or a room—with Christmas spirit, Peluso has some advice.

“A good tip that I would recommend to anyone decorating their home for the holidays is that lighting and color go a long way, but when you add music plus a fragrance, such as a candle or potpourri, the decorations become even more captivating since they will touch on all your senses,” he said.

Check out the window displays through Christmas at 111 North State St.

Cold weather, hot chocolate: Getting the most from your mug

By Taylor Hartz | Staff Writer

 

When the weather gets cold and the Christmas tunes start playing, nothing gets the body warm like a mug full of hot chocolate. For the best tastes, check out:

Hot Chocolate Bakery, 125 S. Clark St. (inside Revival Hall)

Start with the Medium for a basic milk chocolate flavor with a touch of caramel, then move on to the Dark, made of 72 percent dark chocolate. Mexican hot chocolate is also available at  $6 per cup. Drinks include a house-made marshmallow that takes up almost the whole mug and adds a milky sweetness as it melts. Adults can try the drink with cognac, whiskey, rum or brandy.

Ghiradelli 400 or 830 N. Michigan Ave.

At Ghirardelli, try the Lombard Street Hot Cocoa for $4.25—a cup of hot steamed milk served with four of the chocolate shop’s sweet milk chocolate and truffle squares to mix into your drink, or try the Sea Salt Caramel Hot Cocoa topped with whipped cream,swerved with milk chocolate caramel squares.

Dylan’s Candy Bar, 663 N. Michigan Ave.

Chocolate—hot or frozen—runs for $6, topped with whipped cream, hot fudge and mini marshmallows.

Bombo Bar, 832 W. Randolph St.

The West Loop’s hot spot’s “hotter chocolates” are overflowing with toppings and flavor. Snap some photos of these Instagram-worthy treats before you start sipping. The Hotter Chocolates, $9 each, come in two flavors—S’mores and Party Monster. The drinks may be spiked with Baileys, Stoli Vanilla Vodka, RumChata, Jameson or Grand Mariner for $8.

L.A. Burdick, 609 N. State St.

This 30-year-old New England chocolate shop and cafe has but one Midwestern location—and this is it. The Chicago shop opened in 2017, and though  they are known for their European chocolates, L.A. Burdick also offers a variety of hot cocoas—dark, milk, white or spicy—that start around $5.

Just in time for Christmas, dino SUE gets a new home

Staff reports

 

SUE, the iconic T. rex who held the coveted spot on the Field Museum’s main floor until February, will finally be on display in a new home this holiday season.

The skeleton had been removed from Stanley Field Hall tomake room for the museum’s new Titanosaur cast, Maximo. But, on Dec. 21, SUE’s new suite will open, debuting a brand new habitat to museum visitors.

The biggest and most complete T. rex skeleton in the world, the skeleton that had been on display had, nevertheless, grown out of date given new scientific understanding of T. rex anatomy. So, since coming down, scientists and museum workers have been updating SUE’s skeleton to match the latest science.

One of those updates will be the addition of a set of bones across SUE’s abdomen called gastralia that helped the T. rex breathe, according to Pete Makovicky, the museum’s curator of dinosaurs.

SUE will now live in the Griffin Halls of Evolving Planet in a 5,100 square foot suite filled with interactive displays that mimic the environment an actual T. rex would have lived in.

Among those displays will be “cutting-edge animations showing how SUE would have interacted with other dinosaurs and what the landscape would have looked like,” said Jaap Hoogstraten, Director of Exhibitions, in a press release.

The move has been in the works for quite some time, said Field Museum president Richard Lariviere, in a press release.

“We’re excited to finally complete our decades-long plan to put SUE in a proper scientific context alongside our other dinosaurs and offer an experience that really shows off why SUE is widely considered the greatest dinosaur fossil in the world,” said Lariviere in a press release.

SUE’s new environment “will give visitors a glimpse of the world SUE lived in,” said Hoogstraten in a press release. The new display will also explain how SUE made it to Chicago.

“People will also get to learn about SUE’s discovery and the things scientists have learned about SUE over the last few decades—there’ll be lots of new information and experiences that we weren’t able to get across with the old display,” said Hoogstraten, in a press release.

“This is the biggest, scariest, and most impressive SUE’s ever looked,” said Lariviere, in a press release.

 

 

No ‘paws’ in winter fun for Fido: Indoor activities for your dog

By Stephanie Racine, Staff Writer

 

Doggy Paddle

Doggy Paddle, 1430 W. Willow St., has indoor pools for pups, allowing your four-legged friends to get some aquatic exercise even when the lake is frozen over. Swimming for dogs has many physical and psychological benefits, including improved flexibility and mobility and reduced stress and anxiety, according to Doggy Paddle. where, dogs can swim privately, or in groups based on temperament and experience. An instructor is always present while dogs are in the pool. In the new member pool, the instructor will help guide furry friends. Private swimming lessons are also available. Doggy Paddle also has an indoor dog park, use of which is included with a swim. Vaccinations are required and unneutered dogs can be booked for private swims only. Prices begin at $32 for group swims. For more information, visit doggypaddle.com

K9University

K9University, 2945 W Lake St., has an indoor open-play, climate-controlled dog park, open 9–11 a.m. every Saturday and Sunday that allows your dogs to get out all their energy on winter weekends. To use the park, customers pay $15 for the first dog, with $8 for any additional dogs in the family. Staff is on hand at all times, but owners are encouraged to watch and learn what safe play between dogs looks like, according to K9University’s website. The space is also available for private reservations to throw a puppy birthday party or get-together. K9University recommends checking its calendar for special events or a specific pup party. Vaccinations are required. K9U also features boarding, training and daycare. For more information, visit k9uchicago.com

See Spot shop…

Running errands with a pup can kill two birds with one stone by giving your dog some exercise while you knock things off your to-do list. Certain stores and shops welcome pets in downtown Chicago, so you can bring your buddy along with you. Besides pet stores such as PetSmart or Kriser’s, The Shops at North Bridge, Saks Fifth Avenue, and Bloomingdale’s, at 900 N. Michigan Ave., are pet friendly. Be sure to enter in the Walton entrance for Bloomingdale’s, as the rest of the mall does not allow dogs. Other stores that allow dogs include LUSH, Restoration Hardware, Anthropologie and the Apple Store.

1 2 3 4